TRAINING

CLUB NIGHTS


We run from the Whitchurch Rugby Club, SY13 1EU on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. The entrance to the rugby club is off Sedgeford/Prees Road - not Edgeley Road.




We meet at 7pm and runs start promptly at 7.10 pm.

We split into groups of broadly equal pace to ensure that there are runs suitable for members of all abilities.

We like to keep most runs conversational and look after each other.

Distances range from 3 to 7 miles.

There are also regular organised club sessions encompassing speedwork, hills and other activities! These sessions are open to all club members and are suitable for all abilities.

We are welcome to use the bar at the Rugby Club for drinks after training.

We recommend that you come ready to run as we do not always have access to changing rooms/toilets at the club.

Training advice can be obtained from any member of the coaching team.

Coaching Team

The coaching team is led by Fiona Challinor.

Fiona Challinor

All our coaches are qualified Leaders in Running Fitness.

Our coaches are:
Fiona Challinor
Simon Parsons
Simon Phillips
Adam Richards
Fiona Dillon
Katie Webster
James Rainbow

See our Coach Profiles here

Spring Sessions 2017

These optional sessons are suitable for absolutely all members and all standards. Normal runs available.

The sessions start from the rugby club at the normal time. They are subject to change and refinement!

Head Torch runs will be long(ish) runs around Black Park etc. All participants must wear a head torch without exception.

7th Mar Head Torch Run
14th Mar Hills
21st Mar Faster Back than Out
28th Mar Social Run in the light
4th Apr Reps
11th Apr Hills
18th Apr Relay in the Park
25th Apr Flying 30s

The sessions shown above are subject to change at short notice.

Training Notes

GENERAL

Entire books have been written about training so this page doesn’t pretend to offer all the answers but offers some useful guidance. Training is an individual process – what suits one person may not suit another; but there are general principles that apply to all runners.

This article is aimed at the 10k runner. Marathon training needs more direct guidance and frequently a lengthy training plan. Feel free to speak to me if you are planning to run a marathon and need help in your training.

For those of you who'd like even more guidance, or are just interested, I've put together a section on the common mistakes runners make in training and racing. see Mistakes runners make

STRETCHING

Flexibility can play a crucial role in preventing injury and enhancing performance. If nothing else, you should spend a few minutes stretching the key muscles after a run. The key muscles to gently stetch are:

Hamstrings (Back of leg)

Quadriceps (Thighs)

Calves

Specific stetching routines can also be included in your weekly routine - but not just before a run!

Key stretches are shown here: Stretches

OVERLOAD

Training works on the principle of ‘Overload’. You will have first experienced this phenomenon when you started running and your body needed time to adapt. In simple terms you need to challenge your body by either running further or faster. Most endurance runners achieve this by either increasing the length of their long runs or by running more often. But speed should never be ignored. A balanced program works on both elements.

Once your body has adjusted to a given ‘overload’ you will sadly need to push it even further to achieve greater rewards. This is an indication that training needs to be progressive. Once a ten mile run has become comfortable you may need to consider going even further – or perhaps faster!

OVERTRAINING

It is important to recognise that hard training breaks the body down – the body needs time to adjust to reap the benefits. That’s why it’s rarely wise to have two hard days of training in a row. A hard training session should be followed by a day of easy training or even rest.

Any fool can overtrain. 200 miles a week, running twice, a day is possible (it’s been done) but probably not recommended for most people. Besides – where do you go after that? The key is to train enough to improve but no more. That’s not to say you should undertrain either!!

A maximum of three hard sessions a week is a good guide line. A long run (over 8 miles) may count as a hard session just as much as a hard speed session!

HOW MUCH?

To some extent this will be determined by your domestic and work situation but to effectively race over 10k you should be thinking about running between 30 and 55 miles a week. Your long run should be between 8 and 12 miles. Putting those two boundaries together you can see that you may need to think about training five or more times a week.

Having said that, anything is better than nothing. Four or more sessions are recommended.

WHAT?

Road running is an endurance event and most training should reflect that. But speed is key in all running events. Another component is strength. Effective training will address all these needs in a balanced way. A typical 5 session training week might look something like this:

Mon – Rest
Tue - 6 miles steady
Wed - 4 miles easy
Thurs – Speed session warm up/down 1 mile plus 3 x 1 mile at 5k pace
Fri – Rest
Sat - 6 miles steady
Sun – 10 miles easy

The Thursday speed session could be replaced by hill training to address strength or even a ‘Tempo’ run over two –to three miles. By Tempo we mean a fast steady pace over a distance shorter than race distance. For a 10k runner this might mean running at around 5k pace over two miles or a slightly slower pace over four miles.

Speed work sessions are worthy of an article on their own. At heart though you are entitled to claim you are working on your speed every time you run faster than your normal race pace.

The good news is that there is no need to do the fast repeat 200m runs that might make up an 800m runners training diet!!

Other types of speed work might include:

Fartlek
Alternate fast and slow runs
Time Trials
Out and back runs
Distance repetitions (5 x 800m, 3 x 1 mile etc)
Hill sprints

Don’t forget to build variety into your training runs. There is no need to build boredom into a training routine. Vary the distance or the pace if things are getting too samey. Running with others is another way of fending off boredom.

TRAINING PLANS

It is possible to just decide on the day what you are going to do for your training but in all probability your training will be more effective if you are working to some kind of plan.

A plan should seek to address a given weakness – is it your stamina, your speed or your strength that needs developing?

This might be a very simple plan in the sense that you decide that you are going to increase your long run from 6 miles to 10 miles over an eight week period – increasing the long run by one mile every other week. That works.

Alternatively you might aiming at a given race in twelve weeks time and decide to set down a plan covering every week leading up to that event. This plan would be progressive showing an increase in long run distance and planned speed sessions.

At the extreme a plan might cover a whole year.

For most club runners I would suggest a twelve week plan including two or three races – one or two in the middle and one at the end. Three months allows enough time for a training plan to prove effective and short enough to be able to learn lessons for the next plan.

The beauty of having any form of plan is the ability to monitor it against what actually happened. To that end it is worth keeping a training log. At the end of a planned period the question can be asked – did the plan work? If not - was it because the plan wasn’t followed, or was it because it was the wrong plan?

Either way there will be lessons learned that can be applied to the next plan!

GOAL SETTING

Where possible training should be focussed on a goal of some kind – be it distance or time related. It is the measure of whether a plan has worked or not. A useful approach is to set three levels of objective:

Bronze – acceptable. The minimum you would be happy with.

Silver – The result you have planned for if things go well

Gold – The ultimate. Better than hoped.

Objectives can always be changed if you have set them too low!!

PACE GUIDELINES

Runners world contains a useful Training Pace Calculator